Christopher Confessore, Music Director

OPENING NIGHT:  THE PLANETS | November 16, 2020 at 7:30 pm

Concert Sponsor:  Wendy Brandon

BATES    Mothership               

WILLIAMS    Close Encounters of the Third Kind (excerpts)               

HOLST   The Planets

Our 66th season opens with a Big Bang as we celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing. We blast off with Mothership by Grammy Award-winning composer Mason Bates. Excerpts from John Williams’ iconic score for Close Encounters of the Third Kind will leave us all asking: Are we alone in the universe? Gustav Holst said this about his astrologically inspired masterpiece:  “…the music of The Planets enables the mind to acquire some comprehension of the vastness of space where rational understanding fails.” The Planets premiered over 100 years ago and has mesmerized us ever since.


VISUAL CONCERTOS | January 18, 2020 at 2:00 pm and 7:30 pm

Concert Sponsor:   Brevard Symphony Orchestra South Guild

Nicholas Bardonnay, photographer & multi-media artist

MCALLISTER    In Praise of Joe (World Premiere)                 

VAUGHAN WILLIAMS    Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis with Sagaland by Westwater Arts

SIBELIUS    Finlandia                

ROSSINI    Overture to William Tell

SMETANA    The Moldau and From Bohemia’s Woods & Fields from
Má Vlast with Czech Journeys by Westwater Arts

Beautiful orchestral works of Ralph Vaughan Williams and Bedřich Smetana will be enhanced by the breathtaking imagery and photochoreography by Nicholas Bardonnay of Westwater Arts. The evening begins with a world premiere by Vero Beach native Scott McAllister. Sibelius wrote Finlandia as a way of protesting censorship from Russia and, as such, was often performed under false titles to hide its true intent. William Tell was Rossini’s final opera, known today mostly for its popular, familiar Overture.


A SINATRA VALENTINE | February 8, 2020 at 2:00 pm and 7:30 pm

Concert Sponsor: Nash and Kromash, LLP

Artist Sponsor: Berman Hopkins Wright & Laham CPA and Associates, LLP

Michael Andrew, vocals

Making his first appearance with the BSO in a decade, Michael Andrew will put love in the air with romantic songs made popular by Frank Sinatra, including “My Funny Valentine,” “Fly Me to the Moon,” “New York, New York,” and many others. A former headliner at the famous Rainbow Room atop Rockefeller Center in New York City, Michael is a frequent guest artist with symphony orchestras all over the country. Bring your sweetheart and let Michael Andrew’s sophisticated style sweep you off your feet.


VIVALDI – THE FOUR SEASONS | February 22, 2020 at 7:30 pm

Lisa Ferrigno, violin

SALIERI    Symphony in D Major “Veniziana”          

MOZART    Symphony No. 31 in D Major “Paris”          

VIVALDI    The Four Seasons

BSO concertmaster Lisa Ferrigno will perform the virtuosic solo violin part in Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons, his most well-known work. Listen carefully for a barking dog, buzzing flies, drunk dancers and the crackling of a warm fire. Were Salieri and Mozart enemies? Did Salieri poison Mozart? We may never know for sure. We do know that Salieri and Mozart were rivals for some of the same commissions, but they also collaborated on occasion and each admitted respect for the other, at least publicly. Salieri is considered by many to have been more successful as a teacher than a composer, with Beethoven and Schubert among his students. Mozart’s “Paris” symphony, written when he was just 22 years old, has become one of the most popular of his 41 symphonies.


BEETHOVEN – SYMPHONY NO. 6 “PASTORAL” | March 14, 2020 at 2:00 pm and 7:30 pm

Concert Sponsors:  Dr. Richard and Susan Weber

Amy Porter, flute

RAVEL    Pavane pour une infante défunte

DAUGHERTY   Trail of Tears for solo flute and orchestra

BEETHOVEN    Symphony No. 6 in F Major “Pastoral”

Beethoven depicted his love of nature in his programmatic 6th symphony, originally titled “Pastoral Symphony, or Recollections of Country Life.” Though he worked on both his 5th and 6th symphonies at the same time, they could not be more different. Ravel’s work, which translates literally to Pavane for a Dead Princess, does not refer to death, but to music a young princess may have enjoyed dancing to. Daugherty’s Trail of Tears was written to honor the 4,000 Cherokee who died while forced to walk 800 miles from Georgia to Oklahoma. Daugherty says: “My flute concerto is a musical journey into how the human spirit discovers ways to deal with upheaval, adversity, and adapting to a new environment.” Trail of Tears premiered in 2010, performed by Amy Porter, its dedicatee, and the Omaha Symphony.


Tchaikovsky & Brahms | April 4, 2020 at 7:30 pm

Paul Huang, violin

HIGDON    blue cathedral

TCHAIKOVSKY    Violin Concerto in D Major

BRAHMS    Symphony No. 2 in D Major

Tchaikovsky and Brahms were born on the same day in 1840 and 1833 respectively. They met in person for the first time in 1887 and eventually became friends. Paul Huang returns to perform Tchaikovsky’s spectacular Violin Concerto, once considered unplayable. Brahms wrote his 2nd symphony while on a summer holiday on a lake in Austria. As such, it has often been compared to Beethoven’s Pastoral Symphony. Pulitzer Prize-winner Jennifer Higdon’s blue cathedral, written in memory of her brother Andrew who died in 1998, represents their relationship. The solo clarinet, her brother’s instrument, and the solo flute, hers, begin and end the work.